Sunday, April 15, 2012

Science and SF Tidbits: April 15, 2012

Some of the science and SF links originally posted on Google+ Biology in Science Fiction on Google+Twitter , and Facebook this week:

Good to know in an emergency:
Science, Science Fiction and the Arts
Interesting Bioscience
Exploring Space and Extraterrestrial Life
  • Ancient Astronauts and Forgotten Dreams: End of Space Exploration — Features — Utne Reader »
    Mark Dery remembers the time when dreams of space exploration looked like Disney's Tomorrowland and pulp science fiction.
    "The Space Age is ancient history. Why not admit, then, that its greatest contribution to American culture is the rich fund of symbolism it has given us? The 20th century’s greatest myth, space exploration is the only true new religion since the Bronze Age. Christianity gave us the unforgettable fable of the alien messiah who touched down on planet Earth, assumed human form, sacrificed himself in order to save the species, then rose from the dead and returned to the stars." 
  • Life discovered on Mars .... 36 Years Ago
    "An international team of mathematicians and scientists have re-evaluated data from NASA's Viking mission to Mars over three decades ago, and have come to the conclusion that the data prove life exists on Mars. " 
  • Short Sharp Science: How Earthly life could populate space by panspermia »
    Could life have spread from Earth to the rest of the galaxy?
  • Dinosaurs From Space! »
    Might there be advanced, hyper-intelligent dinosaurs on other planets? A recent paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society looked at "right handed" versus "left handed" chemical building blocks for life. All pretty straightforward biochemistry..
    But for reasons that are unclear, the scientists (perhaps having just finished a+Syfy movie marathon) concluded the paper with a bit of bizarre speculation about dinosaurs on other planets (!!?): 
  • Tardigrade Eggs Might Survive Interplanetary Trip | Wired Science | Wired.com »
    Tardigrades and ticks may take over the galaxy...

No comments: